Q:

What was the outcome of the Tennessee v. Garner case?

A:

Quick Answer

In Tennessee v. Garner (1984), the U.S. Supreme Court upheld the lower court’s opinion that a Tennessee law allowing for the use of deadly force on an escaped felon or suspect violated the Fourth Amendment, according to Oyez. The escapee was not an imminent threat.

Know More

Full Answer

The court ruled that the police must exhibit probable cause of danger in order to shoot an escapee. Under the Fourth Amendment, the act of shooting an escapee was a seizure, explains Oyez.

Edward Eugene Garner was an unarmed teenager who allegedly stole items from a home and fled from the police. While attempting to escape over a fence, a police officer shot him per state law involving hot pursuit.

Learn more about Law

Related Questions

  • Q:

    Who are the U.S. senators from Tennessee?

    A:

    As of October of 2014, the two United States senators from Tennessee are Lamar Alexander and Bob Corker. Alexander began his term in 2003, while Corker began his in 2007. Both men are Republicans.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:
  • Q:

    How long does it take for mail to get to Tennessee from Chicago?

    A:

    A first-class letter mailed through the U.S. Postal Service takes, on average, three days to go from Tennessee to Chicago, according to the USPS map server. The Postal Service does not guarantee three-day delivery although first-class delivery generally takes two to three days.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:
  • Q:

    What are some examples of stare decisis?

    A:

    A situation in which stare decisis would decide the outcome of a trial is when a Mississippi court attempts to try a person for desecrating an American flag. Because the Supreme Court already ruled in Texas v. Johnson in 1989 that the right to freedom of speech protects flag desecration, Mississippi courts cannot convict the person.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:
  • Q:

    How can a felon get his rights back?

    A:

    Convicted felons may regain rights lost as a result of the conviction by contacting the Department of Justice in the state or federal jurisdiction where the case was tried, states The Law Dictionary. Regaining lost rights depends primarily on state laws and the nature of the conviction, states ProCon.org.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:

Explore