Q:

When do I plead "no contest" for a traffic violation?

A:

Quick Answer

The Ohio State Bar Association suggests that individuals consult lawyers before pleading "no contest." In general, that plea is used when the defendant admits to the facts presented to the judge but does not want to admit guilt.

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Full Answer

The OSBA indicates that there is little difference between pleading "guilty" and "no contest." In both cases, the defendant agrees that the facts in the complaint are true. Either way, the judge is likely to find the defendant "guilty;" however, according to Riddell Law, a plea of "no contest" cannot be used against the defendant in any future criminal or civil trial because there has been no confession.

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