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What is a political interest group?

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Quick Answer

A political interest group comprises individuals who work together to spread the word about their particular political view. These groups can be established as either private or public and used to lobby legislation or help to get a particular individual elected to office.

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Full Answer

Political interest groups can be traced back to the early 20th century. These groups may be also referred to as pressure groups because of the influence that they have over government officials. Private political interest groups tend to influence policy in order to help the small group that they represent. Public political interest groups, on the other hand, focus on pushing through issues that affect the broader public in a positive way.

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