Q:

What is a predicate felony?

A:

A predicate felony is used to describe a felony that was committed by a repeat offender. The term is often used during the court process.

Certain restrictions are in place when the courts consider a predicate offense, including the time that has passed since the previous felony was committed and the severity of the crime. Predicate felonies are considered when repeated offenders are being sentenced for their crimes. When taking predicate felonies into consideration, the courts often impose harsher sentences. Predicate felonies are not just limited to one previous offense as each felony can be considered predicate if they commit a crime in order to pull off a more serious crime.


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