Q:

What is the punishment for aggravated menacing in Ohio?

A:

The punishment for the first-degree misdemeanor of aggravated menacing in Ohio is up to 180 days in jail and a fine of up to $1000, according to Nolo. Under special circumstances, the crime can be a fourth- or fifth-degree felony. In those cases, the punishment is more severe.

If the victim of aggravated menacing is either an officer or a children service agency employee engaged in job duties, aggravated menacing is a fifth-degree felony, according to the Ohio Revised Code. This is punishable by a sentence of 6 to 12 months in prison and a fine of up to $2500, according to Nolo. If the offender commits aggravated menacing in these special circumstances and has previously been convicted of or pleaded guilty to an violent offense, the crime is a fourth-degree felony, according to the ORC. This is punishable by a sentence of 6 to 18 months in prison and a fine of up to $5000, according to Nolo.

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