Q:

What is the purpose of a pretrial hearing?

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Quick Answer

According to the American Bar Association, a pretrial hearing is often used to help the judge manage the case, help establish a time frame for all pretrial activities and set a tentative date for the trial. In some instances, a judge may refer special cases, such as child custody hearings, to a special program including dispute resolutions or arbitration.

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Full Answer

Judges also sometimes use a pretrial hearing to encourage both parties of a case to settle before going to trial. All cases where a defendant pleads not guilty must be sent to a pretrial. Failure to attend a pretrial can result in a bench warrant and/or a forfeiture of a bond.

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