What are my rights as a temporary employee?
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Q:

What are my rights as a temporary employee?

A:

Quick Answer

State and federal laws give temporary employees some of the same rights as other employees, including protection against discrimination. CBS News reminds temps that while on lease, they are employees of the agency. Discrimination is illegal, so companies cannot hire only select individuals, such as females in their 20s.

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Full Answer

Temporary employees also have rights under the Family Medical Leave Act, a federal law that prevents them from being fired for taking leave to care for a child, spouse or elderly parent: This depends on if the individual is in a position that creates an employee/employer relationship, according to Find Law.

Legal Match tells temporary employees, that the law states they are entitled to worker's compensation insurance, and state disability coverage if offered in the state. Temporary or permanent employees injured on the job have this right.

There are certain benefits that temporary workers are not qualified to receive, according to Legal Match. The temporary job is temporary, and the agency or its client has the right to fire an employee at will. Find Law adds that temporary employees typically do not qualify for the company's insurance or retirement plan. However, according to PayScale, employees working 1000 or more hours per year are sometimes entitled to some of these benefits. Benefits depend on how each individual contract reads. Many employers choose to limit temporary employees hours to eliminate eligibility for long-term benefits.

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