Q:

What school did Robert Hooke go to?

A:

Robert Hooke was home-schooled by his father until the age of 13. It was then that he entered the Westminster School. From there, he attended Oxford University and began studying science.

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Robert Hooke was born on July 28, 1635, in England. He is most known for his scientific discoveries throughout the 17th century. One of Hooke’s most famous discoveries was the plant cell. He observed the cells under a light microscope and was the first scientist to see and study these types of cells. Hooke also made many observations about fossils under microscopes and was the first scientist to observe fossils in this manner. Today, Hooke is most known for his microscopy discoveries and his famous physic’s law, Hooke’s law.

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Related Questions

  • Q:

    When did Robert Hooke discover cells?

    A:

    Robert Hooke first discovered cells in 1665 at the age of 30. He made the discovery while examining thin slices of cork under a compound microscope and revealed his findings in his book "Micrographia."

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  • Q:

    What is Robert Hooke famous for?

    A:

    Robert Hooke was an influential, experimental scientist in the 17th century. He studied all forms of science including astronomy, chemistry, biology, physics, geology and paleontology.

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  • Q:

    Who was Robert Hooke?

    A:

    Robert Hooke was an English scientist, mathematician and philosopher who lived between 1635 and 1703. He is known for a variety of accomplishments in the scientific world. According to Biography.com, he is recognized mainly for his discovery of elasticity. Hooke's Law on elasticity explains the relationship between force exerted on a mass and its position.

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  • Q:

    Why did Robert Hooke call them cells?

    A:

    Robert Hooke called named cells "cells" because of their similarity to the small rooms in monasteries, also called "cells," in which the monks lived and worked. Hooke first saw cells while examining a specimen of cork with his microscope and was intrigued by the discovery of such structures.

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