Q:

What is second degree criminal sexual conduct?

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Quick Answer

Second degree criminal sexual conduct contains a set of certain acts in which a person commits sexual actions in an offensive manner or in a place where it would often cause concern from an outside party, according to U.S. Legal. It is typically a class B misdemeanor but can be labeled as a class A misdemeanor under the correct circumstances.

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Full Answer

U.S. Legal notes that criminal sexual conduct is also typically called sexual misconduct and is labeled as a first, second or third degree offense. First degree acts of sexual misconduct include any act of a party forcing another to engage in sexual actions against their will. Second degree acts include exposing sexual organs in a public place, committing the act of sexual intercourse in a public place or having sexual contact in a public space, while in the presence of those who would be concerned or offended by the action. Finally, third degree acts of sexual misconduct entail any action committed by an individual that suggests or commits a sexual action to another they know would be unsettled or offended by the request.

All these acts are considered A, B, and C misdemeanors respectively but are automatically raised to the next level misdemeanor or felony if it is not the party's first time to be involved with said conduct. A few other special circumstances can also increase the sentence of each misconduct.

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