Q:

Why is separation of powers important in democracy?

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Quick Answer

Separation of powers in democracy is important because it prevents people from abusing power. Separation of powers also serves as a safeguard to protect freedom for everyone.

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Full Answer

The separation of power is a system that is divided into three different branches: legislative, executive and judicial. The tasks of the state are given to different institutions so that these institutions can check each other's work. This system works so that no one institution makes all the decisions and no one institution can destroy the entire system. The separation of powers is maintained under the check and balances system. The separation of powers is included in the United States Constitution.

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Related Questions

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    What are examples of concurrent powers?

    A:

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