Should juveniles be tried as adults?
Credit:AFPAFPGetty Images
Q:

Should juveniles be tried as adults?

A:

Quick Answer

According to the Equal Justice Initiative, for certain criminal offenses, children are allowed to be tried as adults in every state. Although there is dissent about trying juveniles as adults, many organizations are fighting against it because they maintain that it does more harm than good.

 Know More

Full Answer

According to the Juvenile Law Center, even though it is legal to prosecute juveniles as adults in some circumstances, research suggests that doing so has the potential to cause more harm than good to both the minor and to society. In a study conducted by the Campaign for Youth Justice, it was observed that juveniles are in much greater danger of becoming victims of extreme violence and sexual abuse in an adult facility than if they were in a juvenile detention center or group home.

Additionally, FRONTLINE reports that trying minors as adults in the justice system has little to no effect on reducing juvenile crime rates and further notes that it also creates a greater likelihood of recidivism. The Equal Justice Initiative seeks to find alternatives to placing juveniles in the adult justice system. Due to the efforts of this initiative, the Supreme Court has banned the death penalty for all children serving prison sentences and ruled that trial courts must make final punishment determinations only upon conducting a special assessment hearing.

Learn more about Crime

Related Questions

  • Q:

    What are some examples of minor crimes?

    A:

    Minor crimes in the United States include traffic offenses that do not involve any damage or injury, littering, possession of very small amounts of illegal drugs with no intent to sell, fishing or hunting without a license, jaywalking, or riding public transportation without paying a fare. In the United States, crimes considered relatively less serious are called misdemeanors or infractions and carry lower penalties than more serious felony crimes.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:
  • Q:

    Where is Frank Lucas today?

    A:

    As of 2014, Frank Lucas works with his daughter's non-profit organization in the United States to provide shelter for the children of incarcerated parents. During the 1960s, Lucas was an infamous drug lord with networks in New York and suppliers in Thailand.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:
  • Q:

    Can I move to another state while on probation?

    A:

    According to Illinois criminal attorney Lewis Gaynor, defendants who are placed on probation for committing criminal offenses are not allowed to leave the state without the court's permission. The law provides for one exception pursuant to the Interstate Commission for Adult Offender Supervision. This exception allows the person's probation to be transferred to another state. For transfers shorter than 45 days, offenders may request a travel pass.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:
  • Q:

    What is the penalty for involuntary manslaughter?

    A:

    The penalty for involuntary manslaughter varies widely by state but usually carries a minimum sentence of 12 months in prison plus fines and probation, according to FindLaw. Involuntary manslaughter is considered a felony in all jurisdictions of the United States. Most states base their sentencing guidelines on Federal law, which requires a prison sentence of 12 to 16 months with increased penalties for extremely reckless and automobile-related manslaughter.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:

Explore