Q:

How should statements be written for courts?

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Quick Answer

Court statements should be written in a manner that presents information in a factual and chronological order, which is accomplished by following an organizational structure that includes an introduction, numbered pages and inclusion of a signature and date at the end of the document. Court statements are legal documents written by witnesses and lawyers to provide factual and complete information to judges, who must ultimately decide whether to find defendants innocent or guilty. Statements are submitted to courts at all levels, and must include a certain amount and type of information to be deemed complete.

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Full Answer

Legal statements essentially provide courts with basic information surrounding each case, including important facts and case history. Thorough and accurate statements can help judges and lawyers prepare for cases in advance of hearings, and may shave large amounts of time from the court hearing. Statements also allow judges to have time in advance to come up with questions to ask the attending parties, which are then used to clarify information submitted in their statements. As with many types of academic writings, court statements should follow precise outlines. They begin with an introduction, which includes contact information and credentials of the person preparing the statement. Then, statements lay out the story according to witnesses, and conclude with a "statement of truth" at the end, finalized with a signature and date.

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