Q:

What is the statute of limitations for credit card fraud?

A:

According to U.S. federal law the statute of limitations for credit card fraud is five years. After this time period it is impossible for the government to prosecute a credit card fraud offense.

According to U.S. Code 18 USC 1029, credit cards are considered "access devices" and anyone who knowingly or with fraudulent intent uses, distributes or produces invalid credit cards is subject to prosecution. Those found guilty of credit card fraud can face prison sentences of up to 15 years, as well as a fine and forfeiture of all equipment used in the commission of the crime in question.

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