Q:

What is summary dismissal?

A:

Quick Answer

Summary dismissal, more commonly known as summary judgment, is a ruling by a judge in a civil proceeding that disposes of a case without a trial. A judge summarily dismisses a case, or grants summary judgment, when no dispute over any material fact exists and one of the parties to the civil litigation is entitled to judgment as a matter of law.

  Know More

Full Answer

Any evidence that is admissible at a trial may be included as exhibits when a party makes a motion for summary judgment in a case. A court typically schedules oral arguments when a motion for summary judgment is filed to give the parties an opportunity to more fully explain their positions.

Learn more about Law

Related Questions

  • Q:

    What does "bound over for trial" mean?

    A:

    In legal terms, the phrase "bound over for trial" indicates that a judge believes that there is probable cause for a case to proceed to trial, according to the American Bar Association. Probable cause means that there is enough evidence to credibly suggest a defendant's guilt.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:
  • Q:

    What is a merit trial in Maryland?

    A:

    A merit trial, also known as a trial on merits, focuses on the basic facts of the case. USLegal explains that the judge hears arguments and facts from both sides and decides the case on the merits of each, which is how merit trials in Maryland and throughout the United States function. In such a trial, the plaintiff has the burden of proof.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:
  • Q:

    What is meant by a summary trial?

    A:

    A summary trial is a trial conducted with the judge sitting alone, which means that no jury is present. This trial is held to establish whether the underlying case is eligible for trial by jury.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:
  • Q:

    What is a motion for sanctions?

    A:

    A motion for sanctions is a document submitted to the court to describe conduct that violates rules of the court by the other parties in a civil proceeding, according to the Cornell University Law School's Legal Information Institute. The court may impose sanctions in response.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:

Explore