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What is the supreme law of the land?

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Quick Answer

The supreme law of the land refers to the U.S. Constitution and any federal laws and treaties based upon it. In short, it means that constitutional or federal law is upheld over state law.

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Full Answer

The "supreme law of the land" is noted in the Supremacy Clause of the Constitution, which is found in Article VI, Clause 2. It means that federal law overrides individual state's laws if a conflict in statute occurs. It also requires state judges to uphold federal law over state law thereby making it the supreme law of the land. The Supreme Court interprets and upholds constitutional law.

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Related Questions

  • Q:

    What document is the "Supreme Law of the Land"?

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    The "Supreme Law of the Land" in the United States is the Constitution. This provision is stipulated in Paragraph 2 of Article 6 of the U.S. Constitution, also referred to as the "Supremacy Clause." The clause mandates that federal statutes and international agreements legally precede state laws.

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  • Q:

    Who signs bills into law?

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    As directed by the U.S. Constitution, the president of the United States generally signs federal legislation into law. His signature is not required when Congress overrides a presidential veto or when he declines to act on legislation, in which case a bill automatically becomes law, explains Cornell University Law School.

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  • Q:

    In property law, what does "perpetual easement" mean?

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    In the context of property law, perpetual easement is used to describe the rights entitled to a landowner to make limited use of his neighbor's land, such as crossing it to reach his own property, according to Dictionary.com. The site also notes that perpetual means that something that is never ending or has no limit regarding time.

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  • Q:

    What is the "doctrine of nullification"?

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    In American history, the doctrine of nullification supports states' rights to nullify federal laws that states deem to be unconstitutional, according to Pearson Education. This theory was promulgated by Thomas Jefferson and James Madison in the late 1790s. The nullification crisis of the 1820s revolved around South Carolina's objection to federal tariffs on English textiles, because the state felt the tariffs benefited industrial states in the North.

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