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What is the supreme law of the land?

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The supreme law of the land refers to the U.S. Constitution and any federal laws and treaties based upon it. In short, it means that constitutional or federal law is upheld over state law.

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What is the supreme law of the land?
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The "supreme law of the land" is noted in the Supremacy Clause of the Constitution, which is found in Article VI, Clause 2. It means that federal law overrides individual state's laws if a conflict in statute occurs. It also requires state judges to uphold federal law over state law thereby making it the supreme law of the land. The Supreme Court interprets and upholds constitutional law.

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Related Questions

  • Q:

    What document is the "Supreme Law of the Land"?

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    The "Supreme Law of the Land" in the United States is the Constitution. This provision is stipulated in Paragraph 2 of Article 6 of the U.S. Constitution, also referred to as the "Supremacy Clause." The clause mandates that federal statutes and international agreements legally precede state laws.

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    In property law, what does "perpetual easement" mean?

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  • Q:

    What does the Supremacy Clause of the Constitution mean?

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    The Supremacy Clause states that the Constitution, the laws of the United States and all treaties under the authority of the United States are deemed the supreme law of the land, meaning it overrides state constitutions and laws. It is the second clause of Article VI of the Constitution.

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    Who makes laws?

    A:

    The legislative branch of the U.S. government, collectively known as Congress, has the authority to make federal laws in the United States, according to attorney Lloyd Duhaime and iCivics. Article 1 of the U.S. Constitution gives lawmaking powers to the Senate and House of Representatives as two chambers of Congress.

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