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What is a third-degree felony in Florida?

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In Florida, a third-degree felony is the least serious felony-related charge within the state and often comes with a maximum punishment of up to 5 years in prison. This degree felony is one of the most frequently committed offenses in the state, and often, first-time offenders are charged with third-degree felonies.

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What is a third-degree felony in Florida?
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According to the law offices of Eric M. Matheny, P.A., some examples of third-degree felonies in Florida include possession of drugs like cocaine, oxycodone or more than 20 grams of marijuana, along with burglary of an unoccupied conveyance or structure, aggravated assault, felony battery, resisting an officer with violence and a third or subsequent driving under the influence occurrence. Certain third-degree felonies come with mandatory minimum sentences, including felony DUI and aggravated assault with a firearm. In addition to imprisonment, defendants charged with a third-degree felony can be instructed to pay the victim restitution as per court order.

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