Q:

What is a third degree felony in Texas?

A:

A third degree felony is a crime that carries a penalty of 2 to 10 years of imprisonment and a fine of up to $10,000. Some examples of third degree felonies in Texas include possession of 5 to 50 pounds of marijuana and a drive-by shooting with no injury.

Theft of property valued at $20,000 or more (but less than $100,000) is also an example of a third degree felony.

It is possible to get probation in place of a prison sentence. Conditions of probation may include completing a rehabilitation program, community service or up to 180 days of incarceration in a county jail.


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