Q:

What is the "no trespassing law" for private property?

A:

Quick Answer

According to the Legal Information Institute of Cornell University, trespassing is "defined by the act of knowingly entering another person’s property without permission." Trespassing law varies from place to place, but it generally contains similar elements in all of its manifestations.

Know More
What is the "no trespassing law" for private property?
Credit: Barbara Rich Moment Getty Images

Full Answer

Certain elements of trespass law allow for some amount of interpretation. For instance, one example given by the Reporters Committee for Freedom of the Press states that reporters and journalists gain implied consent if they are allowed onto a property to ask the owner some questions. Trespassing is typically determined by the owner of the property; however, a renter has allowances to control who is allowed on the property.

Learn More

Related Questions

  • Q:

    What should you do about abandoned vehicles on private property?

    A:

    The laws concerning abandoned vehicles vary somewhat by state, but in most cases, the owner of the private property needs to get in touch with law enforcement to remove an abandoned vehicle. If the private property owner contacts a towing company, the towing company must then contact law enforcement. Another option is for the property owner to obtain the title of the abandoned vehicle and then decide what to do with it.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:
  • Q:

    Can a private citizen sue the President?

    A:

    A private citizen may sue the President over alleged actions undertaken before or independently of the Presidential office. When the President acts on the authority of his office in any way, he is shielded by the doctrines of immunity.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:
  • Q:

    What are the reasons for evicting tenants?

    A:

    Landlords can legally evict tenants for failing to pay rent, committing illegal acts on the property and violating lease obligations, according to the Office of the Tenant Advocate in Washington, D.C. The D.C. Office of the Tenant Advocate also indicates that landlords can pursue evictions when they intend to use the rental unit for personal occupancy or plan to sell, convert or extensively remodel the property.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:
  • Q:

    How do you divide Social Security benefits in divorce?

    A:

    The Ohio State Bar Association states that Social Security benefits are considered marital assets, which means that they have to be equally divided as part of an equitable division of property. Social Security benefits are a type of deferred wages that are accumulated during a marriage and held for future distribution.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:

Explore