What does USDA stand for?
Credit: Maximilian Stock Ltd. Photographer's Choice Getty Images
Q:

What does USDA stand for?

A:

Quick Answer

USDA stands for the United States Department of Agriculture. The USDA is a federal executive department that was formed in 1862. It serves to develop and promote polices that help Americans working in the farming or ranching sectors, encourage good nutrition and eradicate hunger.

Know More

Full Answer

Some of the ways in which the USDA helps those living and working in rural areas are by promoting new types of technology, encouraging agricultural research and offering rural citizens special types of insurance and mortgages.

The Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program, or SNAP, for low-income people and the Women, Infants and Children, or WIC, benefits for low-income mothers and children are headed by the USDA. Both of these programs are intended to provide food benefits to prevent hunger and poor nutrition.

Learn More

Related Questions

  • Q:

    What does NSA stand for?

    A:

    NSA stands for National Security Agency, which is part of the U.S. Department of Defense. Its main tasks are to ensure American security and to obtain information that America's enemies wish to keep secret. It is one of the largest U.S. intelligence agencies in terms of budget.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:
  • Q:

    What is a USDA loan?

    A:

    USDA loans are home loans for relatively low-income borrowers who wish to purchase a home in a rural area. Unlike most mortgages, no down payment is required.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:
  • Q:

    What fringe benefits do members of Congress enjoy?

    A:

    Members of Congress get automatic pay raises, a full pension, free parking in many parking lots and garages throughout Washington, D.C., and a lucrative 401k plan. As of 2011, a congressman's salary sat at around $174,000 per year, and with benefits, that figure jumps to around $250,000 per year.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:
  • Q:

    What are examples of a chief legislator?

    A:

    A chief legislator most often refers to the president of the United States, who has the authority to influence members of Congress to make laws through veto power, signing a bill, speaking directly to Congress and meeting with individual members of the legislative body. Article II, Section 3 of the Constitution of the United States gives the president the authority to "recommend... such measures as... necessary and expedient."

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:

Explore