Q:

Who works in the judicial branch?

A:

The members of the U.S. Supreme Court, the U.S. District Courts and the 13 U.S. Courts of Appeals all make up the judicial branch. The judicial branch was established by Article III of the Constitution.

Members of the legislative and executive branches are elected, while judicial branch members are appointed by the President and then confirmed by the Senate. Unlike elected officials, the justices and judges do not serve set terms. Congress is generally in control of the jurisdiction held by federal courts. However, in some cases, the U.S. Supreme Court takes over jurisdiction, such as when two states are in a dispute.

Sources:

  1. whitehouse.gov

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