Q:

How do you write a legal letter for the guardianship of a grandchild?

A:

A legal letter written for the guardianship of a grandchild must come from the court and is granted when a grandparent applies and is awarded guardianship of their grandchild, as noted by the Arizona Judicial Branch website. The "letter of guardianship" is provided by the court and grants the grandparents the legal right to make decisions on behalf of their grandchild.

To pursue legal guardianship of one's grandchildren, one must first notify the parents. Then the grandparents must contact a lawyer and go to a court hearing. To get the letter of guardianship granted and written by the court, the grandparents must be able to prove that the grandchild's parents are either dead, missing or are unable to properly and care for the grandchild. If it is in the best interests of the grandchild to be placed with the grandparents, then the court will write the letter. This status provides more benefits for grandparents compared to the "caregivers with legal custody" status.

There are several benefits to guardianship that differ from custody arrangements. With guardianship, the parent of the child cannot take the grandchild away from the grandparents unless they do so through a court hearing. The grandparents can also decide where the grandchild will live, what kind of medical care the grandchild will receive and what kind of education the grandchild will receive, regardless of the parent's wishes.

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