Q:

What are bile salts?

A:

Bile salts are responsible for the critical function of digestion and the balance of the gall bladder, liver and bile ducts, according to the Italian Society of Gastroenterology. Bile salts also play a vital role in the absorption of cholesterol in the body.

Bile salts are a crucial part of the intake of fats during the digestive process, according to the Biochemical Journal. During digestion, fats are metabolized in the intestine with the help of bile acids, which include bile salts. After digestion, 95 percent of bile acids are returned to the liver and secreted back into the hepatobiliary system. Bile acids and salts are also known to affect hormonal behavior in the body.


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