Q:

Can catnip get a human high?

A:

Quick Answer

According to New York University, there is no real scientifically confirmed way that catnip can get a human high. However, it is used as a traditional sleep aid and uterine stimulant, along with being used recreationally by those who believe it has an effect.

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Full Answer

WebMD warns that, while it is generally safe, higher doses of catnip can have adverse side effects. Smoking it or overuse of catnip tea can result in headaches, nausea and even vomiting. Its status as a traditional uterine stimulant, which has not been disproved, makes it a special risk to women, particularly pregnant women. It may be able to cause miscarriage, or worsen a heavy period in women who are not pregnant.

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