Q:

Can ginger tea induce labor?

A:

Ginger is among a variety of teas that are purported to have properties that induce labor. According to LoveToKnow.com, some experts claim that sipping herbal teas can bring about labor, while others say it is simply a means of willing the baby to come.

Though it's always wise to speak with a physician, midwife or certified naturopathic doctor before consuming anything that is said to quicken labor, a few herbal teas may have specific benefits. Pregnancy-To-Childirth.com recommends partridgeberry, raspberry leaf and cottonroot as the safest herbs for inducing labor. Blue conosh is believed to be most effective, but it can have negative effects on the baby.


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