Q:

Can you save a loose permanent tooth?

A:

According to Plaza Drive Dentistry, the likelihood of saving a loose permanent tooth varies. A slightly loose tooth typically tightens up without any intervention. If an injury knocks a tooth very loose, a dentist must be consulted within 2 hours in order to have any chance of saving it.

Plaza Drive Dentistry explains that loose teeth are also a symptom of gum disease. The gums recede and do not hold teeth properly. Grinding teeth sometimes causes one or more teeth to become loose. This problem is usually treated by having the patient wear a mouth guard to protect teeth and prevent grinding.

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Related Questions

  • Q:

    Can a loose tooth be fixed?

    A:

    Under most conditions, a loose tooth is treatable. Treatments vary widely and factors such as extent of mobility, the time that has elapsed, and the cause of the loosening affect the options available.

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  • Q:

    How long does it take for a permanent tooth to grow in after losing a baby tooth?

    A:

    According to Southeast Family Dental, the amount of time it takes for an adult tooth to come in after a child loses his baby tooth depends on the individual child's situation. Normally, it takes a child anywhere from seven days to six months to grow a permanent tooth.

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    How does tooth whitening gel work?

    A:

    Tooth whiteners use either carbamide peroxide or hydrogen peroxide to bleach the tooth surface. Carbamide peroxide breaks down into hydrogen peroxide and urea when in the mouth, and the hydrogen peroxide whitens the teeth.

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  • Q:

    What is a dead tooth?

    A:

    According to Ala Moana Dental Care, a dead tooth is any tooth that has permanent damage to its inner nerve. Trauma, decay, excessive clenching of the teeth and gum disease can all result in the death of a tooth. It is important for patients to explore treatment options to prevent an unchecked infection from taking hold in the dead tooth and overwhelming surrounding bone, causing further damage to other teeth.

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