Q:

How can you slow down menstrual bleeding?

A:

Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs such as naproxen, ketoprofen and ibuprofen help to slow heavy menstrual bleeding, according to Dr. Christiane Northrup, M.D. To achieve this effect, take one of these drugs one to two days prior to the start of the menstrual period, and continue taking it throughout the heaviest days of the cycle.

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According to Dr. Northrup, birth control pills help slow menstrual flow in women who have uterine fibroids, excess circulating levels of estrogen and in those who do not ovulate. The physicians of North Shore Gynecology claim that endometrial ablation, a procedure that freezes or cauterizes the endometrial lining, helps reduce menstrual bleeding, as well. In fact, endometrial ablation stops the menstrual periods completely in some patients. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, or CDC, a non-hormonal medication known as tranexamic acid is another option for those experiencing heavy menstrual bleeding. This medication is more effective than nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory medications and is taken three times daily while menstrual blood flow is heaviest. Tranexamic acid is not a hormone and is classified as an anti-fibrinolytic medication.

According to the CDC, intrauterine contraception helps to regulate menstrual periods and to lighten the flow of menstrual bleeding by releasing medication directly into the uterus. The CDC also states that hysterectomy, the surgical removal of the uterus, eliminates menstrual bleeding altogether. However, this is a significant surgical procedure, and women who undergo this procedure no longer have the ability to become pregnant.

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Related Questions

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    Is brown-colored bleeding after your period a cause for concern?

    A:

    Brown discharge following a menstrual period typically consists of older blood naturally flushed out of the body when a female's period ends, explains Palo Alto Medical Foundation. Brown discharge or spotting can also occur during ovulation and in the early stages of pregnancy.

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    How do you stop menstrual bleeding?

    A:

    Hormonal birth control products, such as the pill, patch and ring, can be used to delay or eliminate menstrual bleeding, explains Women'sHealth. Women who do not use hormonal birth control can use norethisterone, a progestogen hormone tablet, to stop their menstrual cycles temporarily, says Patient.co.uk. These methods must be taken before menstrual bleeding starts, as there is no safe or effective way to stop a period once it starts.

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    What causes changes in the menstrual cycle?

    A:

    Changes in the menstrual cycle can result from taking contraception, eating disorders, stress, lack of sleep, or a sharp increase in exercise, among many other factors, according to WebMD. Other factors that can affect a woman's menstrual cycle include pregnancy, breastfeeding, polycystic ovary syndrome, pelvic inflammatory disease and uterine fibroids, according to the Mayo Clinic.

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    How do you shorten your menstrual cycle?

    A:

    A woman's period may be shortened by various chemical or behavioral factors, according to The Access Project and WebMD. Chemical factors consist of substances that effect hormone levels, such as the ones in birth control pills or different plants, while behavioral factors include exercise, sexual intercourse and drinking enough water.

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