Q:

What is the cause of a bubble on my eye?

A:

A bubble on the eyeball commonly indicates swollen conjunctiva due to allergic conjunctivitis, a condition in which the eye becomes inflamed in response to external irritants, such as animal dander and outdoor pollens, according to the American Association for Pediatric Ophthalmology and Strabismus. Additional irritants include house dust and mold.

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Topical eye drops and certain chemicals in perfumes or soaps can also cause allergic conjunctivitis, according to Healthline. Contact lens solution can trigger symptoms in sensitive individuals.

Common symptoms of allergic conjunctivitis include itching, inflammation and swelling, notes Healthline. Small bumps may also develop inside of the eyelids. Allergic conjunctivitis can also cause burning eyes, tearing, dilated eye vessels and discharge with a string-like consistency, according to MedlinePlus. Individuals who suffer from the condition due to outdoor pollens may notice that their symptoms become worse during periods of hot, dry weather.

Treatments for allergic conjunctivitis include topical antihistamine eye drops, steroid eye drops and oral antihistamines, according to MedlinePlus. Sufferers may also be prescribed eye drops that work to prevent the blood cells from releasing histamines in response to allergic triggers. Over-the-counter moisturizing eye drops and cool compresses placed over the eyes may also help to soothe irritation; however, it is important for sufferers to consult with a physician if symptoms are persistent.

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