Q:

How does your cervix feel during your period?

A:

The cervix hangs low and is hard to the touch during menstruation, according to FertilityAuthority.com. The cervical opening is similar in texture to the smooth cartilage at the tip of the nose. Following menstruation, the cervix shifts upward and is soft to the touch.

Clear Passage Physical Therapy explains that pain in the cervical opening during menstruation can occur if the cervix is injured or if the opening itself is covered with adhesions that block menstrual flow.

Healthline suggests that women with cervical stenosis, a medical condition in which the cervix is underdeveloped, often experience pain during menstruation due to pressure on the cervical opening.


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