Q:

Do collagen supplements work?

A:

Oral collagen supplements reduce wrinkle depth around the eyes, according to Cristina Mueller for Prevention magazine. Studies show an average reduction of 20 percent in wrinkle depth, with some subjects demonstrating a 50 percent reduction.

As Nina Elias for Prevention magazine explains on Fox News, these same studies showed a continuing effect of a 11.5 percent reduction in wrinkle depth a full four weeks after the test subjects stopped taking the collagen supplements. Subjects over 50 years old also showed significant improvements in hydration and skin elasticity. In addition, as Mueller notes, the bodies of subjects taking collagen supplements increased internal production of procollagen by 65 percent.


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