Q:

Do first degree burns scar?

A:

First degree burns do not scar if properly treated, according to Healthline. This type of burn is called a "superficial burn" because it typically only affects the outermost layer of skin.

Because first degree burns affect the top layer of skin, the signs and symptoms of the burn will go away as those skin cells shed, Healthline states. If properly treated, a first degree burn will heal within three to six days. If the area of skin that is burned is larger than three square inches or if it is on the face or a major joint, it should be looked at by a doctor.

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