Q:

Are hot showers bad for You?

A:

According to HowStuffWorks, hot showers are bad for the skin. Regular hot showers strip the skin of its natural oils which can cause dry patches of skin that may itch and begin to crack. Hot showers affect the skin even worse in cold weather, when hot showers are most common.

HowStuffWorks states that hot showers abuse the outermost layer of the skin, which is called the epidermis. The hot water, together with soap, strips away the oil on the epidermis to cause dry skin. The level of damage to the skin depends on the temperature of the water and the length of the shower.

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