Q:

What is a hypodense liver lesion?

A:

A hypodense liver lesion is an abnormality that is less dense than the surrounding liver tissue as seen in a radiological scan, such as a Computed Tomography scan or Magnetic Resonance Imaging, explains HealthTap. Hypodense liver lesions range from benign cysts to cancerous metastases, according to the Radiology Assistant.

HealthTap explains that up to 50 percent of adults display liver lesions in scans, with the vast majority of lesions being benign. A radiologist is trained to know when further studies are required to diagnose a liver lesion, so The Oncologist recommends CT scans as the best choice for identifying suspected liver cancers.


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