Q:

What is medicated Vaseline?

A:

Medicated Vaseline contained phenol, an early antiseptic, and was also known as Carbolated Vaseline. The production of Medicated Vaseline was discontinued by the Pond's company in the 1970s.

Medicated petroleum jelly containing phenol was used to relieve the pain and itching associated with common skin irritations, including burns, scrapes and insect bites. However, the compound phenol is toxic and can irritate the skin. J.R. Watkins Inc. sells a similar product called Petro-carbo salve or Black Drawing salve, as of 2014. The Watkins company's medicated salve contains 1.5 percent phenol, and the company recommends that the product is not used over large areas of the body.

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    A:

    Vaseline is used to remove false eyelashes, to help insert earrings, as a highlighter for cheekbones, to soothe cracked heels and to define lashes, states Allure magazine. Vaseline is also used to tame eyebrows, moisturize the face, prevent uneven absorption of spray tanner and heal sunburns.

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    A:

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    A:

    According to About.com, petroleum jelly, which is found in Vaseline, contains polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons from unrefined petrolatum that are considered to be carcinogenic. While Vaseline contains this product, Dr. Alan Dattner of Huffington Post states that all the harmful ingredients are filtered out but may be found in imitation products.

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    What should I do if my dog ate Vaseline?

    A:

    If a dog ingests Vaseline or any brand of petroleum jelly, petMD recommends taking the petroleum jelly from the dog, calling the pet poison line and monitoring the dog for signs of illness. Inducing vomiting is not the correct approach. Symptoms such as fever, vomiting, diarrhea, dizziness, confusion, pawing at the muzzle, instability or difficulty breathing could indicate aspiration pneumonia in the dog.

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