What is the normal range for endometrial thickness?
Credit:BSIP/UIGUniversal Images GroupGetty Images
Q:

What is the normal range for endometrial thickness?

A:

Quick Answer

Normal values for endometrial thickness range from 2 to 16 millimeters, depending on the stage of the menstrual cycle. These values also depend on whether the women is pre- or post-menopausal and whether she uses hormonal therapy.

 Know More

Full Answer

In pre-menopausal women, normal values for endometrial thickness are 2 to 4 millimeters during menstruation, 5 to 7 millimeters during the early proliferative phase, up to 11 millimeters during the late proliferative phase and up to 16 millimeters during the secretory phase. Normal values for post-menopausal women who are no't using hormonal therapy are lower than 5 millimeters. For patients undergoing hormone therapy, values up to 16 millimeters are considered normal. The endometrial thickness is an essential parameter in determining the risk of carcinoma in post-menopausal women.

Learn more about Reproductive Anatomy

Related Questions

  • Q:

    What parts of the body do you have to push when giving birth?

    A:

    Termed "bearing down," the last stage of labor includes pushing the baby through the birth canal in a way that many mothers equate to having a bowel movement, according to BabyCenter. Once the cervix is fully dilated to 10 centimeters, a woman is told to push in a downward motion as much as possible with each contraction to begin moving the baby out of the uterus.

    Full Answer >
  • Q:

    Which hormone causes the womb lining to thicken?

    A:

    The hormone estrogen causes the womb lining or endometrium to thicken during the first part of the menstrual cycle, the American Congress of Obstetricians and Gynecologists. Estrogen is manufactured in the ovaries. If pregnancy does not occur during a cycle, then this lining is released from the body through monthly menstruation.

    Full Answer >
  • Q:

    What is a disordered proliferative endometrium?

    A:

    Disordered proliferative endometrium is a result of an anovulatory cycle that lacks ovulation and leads to high levels of estrogen from low progesterone levels. The University of Virginia School of Medicine describes anovulation as the absence of ovulation during the reproductive years, not including pregnancy, and is the most common cause of dysfunctional uterine bleeding. Anovulation commonly occurs at menarche and at menopause.

    Full Answer >
  • Q:

    What is polycystic ovary syndrome?

    A:

    Polycystic ovary syndrome is a condition that is caused by an imbalance of a woman's hormonal levels; it leads to irregularities in the menstrual cycle, difficulty conceiving a baby, ovarian cysts and other health problems. If left untreated, polycystic ovary syndrome can lead to serious health issues, including heart disease and diabetes, according to WebMD.

    Full Answer >

Explore