Q:

What is the nursing care plan for bronchial asthma?

A:

Quick Answer

According to Nurseslabs, there are multiple care plans available to treat different complications related to bronchial asthma. Plans require the nurse to adequately hydrate the patient, encourage deep-breathing and coughing exercises, reinforce a low-salt and low-fat diet, demonstrate diaphragmatic and pursed-lip breathing and assist the patient in administering medication through a nebulizer. Nurses are advised to avoid topics that irritate or upset the patient.

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Full Answer

Nurseslabs outlines bronchial asthma complications, including ineffective airway clearance, ineffective breathing patterns, impaired gas exchange, tiredness and fatigue and risk for activity intolerance. The care plans for these aggravations are somewhat similar, but contain slightly differences. For example, a nurse typically instructs a patient struggling with ineffective airway clearance to avoid bronchial irritants, such as cigarette smoke, aerosols, extreme temperatures and fumes. Patients suffering from fatigue related to physical exertion often requires the assistance of a nurse to plan an activity schedule and identify activities that lead to weakness.

In an effort to minimize breathing difficulties, a nurse can elevate the head of a patient's bed and change the position of the patient every two hours. As a part of outpatient care related to increased mucus production, nurses teach patients to identify early signs of infection, so that a clinician can be contacted immediately if future complications arise.

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