Q:

What is solar urticaria?

A:

Quick Answer

Solar uticaria is a true allergic reaction to sunlight. This condition causes hives on the exposed, and sometimes unexposed, skin of people who suffer from the condition, according to How Stuff Works. Uticaria is another word for hives.

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Full Answer

Worldwide, three people in 100,000 suffer from solar uticaria, according to How Stuff Works. Anyone can get solar uticaria, but women and people under the age of 40 are most susceptible. When a person has solar uticaria, the skin is ultrasensitive to UV radiation and breaks out in a red, itchy rash. No cause is known for the affliction, but some experts feel it is cause by an adverse reaction in the immune system.

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