Q:

Does stress cause acid reflux?

A:

Quick Answer

According to Healthline, stress does seem to be a trigger for acid reflux. However, studies show that people most likely become more sensitive to acid in the esophagus due to stress; in other words, the body is not actually producing more acid.

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Does stress cause acid reflux?
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Full Answer

One side effect of stress, exhaustion, is especially connected to an increase in acid reflux. Other triggers include smoking, carrying excess body weight and sleeping too soon after a large meal. Eating foods that are high in acid, fat or spice contributes to acid reflux. It is also aggravated by taking drugs that irritate the stomach, such as aspirin or ibuprofen, according to WebMD. Some women have acid reflux for the first time when they are pregnant.

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Related Questions

  • Q:

    What are good foods to eat with acid reflux?

    A:

    According to WebMD, people who suffer from acid reflux should eat a diet rich with low acid foods. These foods will alkalize the stomach and help reduce acid reflux symptoms.

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  • Q:

    What is acid flux?

    A:

    Acid flux, also known as acid reflux, is a condition in which acid from the stomach moves into the esophagus, explains WebMD. This often causes a burning sensation in the chest, which is sometimes known as heartburn.

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  • Q:

    Does apple cider vinegar cure acid reflex?

    A:

    Apple cider vinegar is a natural at-home remedy that may help reduce acid reflux, according to apple-cider-vinegar-benefits.com. This type of vinegar has many attributes, but as of 2014, no published medical research supports using it to treat acid reflux, according to RefluxMD.

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  • Q:

    How do you get rid of acid reflux?

    A:

    Doctors normally treat gastroesophageal reflux disease with over-the-counter medications, such as antacids, histamine H2-blockers and proton pump inhibitors, according to WebMD. Motility drugs and surgery may be recommended for more serious GERD cases. The University of Illinois' McKinley Health Center explains patients may eat a special GERD diet to alleviate symptoms. This diet attempts to decrease the symptoms associated with gastric fluid moving into the esophagus.

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