Q:

What treatment is recommended for chlorine-burned eyes?

A:

Quick Answer

For chlorine-burned eyes, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommends rinsing the eyes with plain water for 10 to 15 minutes. A patient who wears contacts should first remove the contacts and discard them. A patient who wears eyeglasses can wash them with soap and water before wearing them.

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Full Answer

There is no antidote for chlorine exposure, states the CDC. Medical personnel remove chlorine from the body as expediently as possible and provide supportive medical care. The prognosis depends on the extent of exposure to chlorine and how quickly corrective measures are taken, explains Healthline. Emergency medical attention is required for anyone suffering from chlorine poisoning.

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