Q:

Is vinegar bad for your teeth?

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Quick Answer

Vinegar is not only bad for a person's teeth, it is among the greatest contributors to tooth enamel loss, according to Sharecare. A study of teenagers revealed a dramatic increase in enamel erosion among those who regularly consume vinegar-laden foods, such as salad dressings, potato chips and pickles.

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Full Answer

Teens suffer the greatest risk of enamel erosion because their enamel isn't fully mature, reports Sharecare, though all people face risks. Using a mouth rinse after consuming foods or drinks with vinegar minimizes the risks of erosion. WebMD also notes that the acid in vinegar is bad for the esophagus as well.

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