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Was Andrew Jackson a good president or a bad president?

A:

Quick Answer

By most accounts, Andrew Jackson is considered by historians as a good president and highly influential. Jackson was the seventh president, serving two terms from 1829 to 1837.

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Was Andrew Jackson a good president or a bad president?
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Full Answer

The election of Jackson triggered the rise of the common man, as he was the first president to originate from humble beginnings. He believed strongly in preserving the union and in limiting the power of the wealthy. The one knock against Jackson by critics is that he forced the Cherokee Indians to move to reservations west of the Mississippi. Their troop-guided evacuation in 1838 and 1839 that resulted in thousands of deaths became known as the "Trail of Tears."


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