Q:

What did Charles Babbage invent?

A:

Quick Answer

During the 1820s, Charles Babbage invented the difference engine, a machine that was capable of making mathematical calculations. Babbage also invented the analytical engine, which was a machine that could read punch cards to perform arithmetical calculations and had a built-in memory unit for storing numbers.

  Know More

Full Answer

Charles Babbage also designed plans for a second difference engine, which would be an improved version of the first machine. Babbage was a member of the Royal Society and helped create the Astronomical Society in 1820. He also served as the Lucasian Professor of Mathematics at the University of Cambridge between 1828 to 1839. Babbage died on Oct. 18, 1871 in London, leaving both the analytical engine and the second difference engine unfinished.

Learn more about Computer History
Sources:

Related Questions

  • Q:

    Why is Charles Babbage famous?

    A:

    Charles Babbage was an English engineer, inventor and mathematician who invented the first automatic digital computer. Scholars consider Babbage to be one of the "fathers of the computer." He is most famous for his series of machines known as analytical engines, complex apparatuses designed to perform general computation.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:
  • Q:

    What did Charles Drew invent?

    A:

    Charles Drew was an African-American doctor responsible for discovering crucial techniques for the storage of blood to be used for future transfusions. His work led to the widespread use of blood banks.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:
  • Q:

    What did Charles Townshend invent?

    A:

    Charles Townshend is responsible for inventing the four-field crop rotation system. Although similar systems had been used in the past in agriculture, Townshend was the first to improve upon it and bring it to Great Britain.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:
  • Q:

    What did Charles Coulomb invent?

    A:

    Charles-Augustin de Coulomb invented the device known as the torsion balance, which could measure minuscule changes and then provide an estimate on the force of repulsion or attraction between the two present charged bodies. Coulomb gathered data from his torsion balance, which later provided him with the information he needed to create Coulomb's law.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:

Explore