Q:

How did Delaware get its name?

A:

Quick Answer

The state of Delaware derived its name from the Delaware Bay, which was designated in honor of Sir Thomas West, Lord De La Warr. De La Warr was the 12th baron De La Warr in England.

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Due to his prominent stature in society and sizable investment in the Virginia Company of London, De La Warr received an appointment as Virginia's first governor and permanent captain-general. In March 1610, De La Warr sailed for the colonies, with Samuel Argall at the helm. It was during their Mid-Atlantic journey when Argall discovered a bay and named it after the governor. The Delaware River and Delaware Native Americans also took their names from De La Warr.

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