Q:

How did Eisenhower get the name "Ike"?

A:

Quick Answer

As reported by his family members, every son in Dwight Eisenhower's nuclear family growing up was called "Ike" at some point in their lives. He was called "Little Ike" and his brother, Edgar, was "Big Ike."

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How did Eisenhower get the name "Ike"?
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Full Answer

As Dwight Eisenhower's career in the military progressed, he was given the nickname "General Ike." Eisenhower was also given the nickname "The Kansas Cyclone" because of his prowess in football as a running back. Another nickname he received during the course of his life was "Duckpin" because of his love for duckpin bowling, a game that features smaller balls and pins than regulation bowling.

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