Q:

When did the hippie era end?

A:

According to the Encyclopedia Britannica, the hippie era started to wane by the mid-1970s, and by the 1980s, hippies had given way to a new generation called yuppies, also known as young urban professionals. Yuppies were young people intent on making careers for themselves in business.

A hippie, which is also spelled hippy, is a member of a countercultural movement that rejected mainstream American life during the 1960s and 1970s. The hippie movement started on college campuses in the United States and eventually spread to other countries, including Canada and Britain. The hippie movement partly arose from an opposition to the United States involvement in the Vietnam War, but hippies were often not directly engaged in politics. The activist counterparts to hippies were called yippies, who were involved in the Young International Party.

Learn More
Sources:

Related Questions

  • Q:

    Why was Birmingham so important in 1963?

    A:

    Birmingham was important in 1963 because it was in this Alabama city that a very crucial civil rights campaign was born and met with some success. Project C, or the Birmingham Campaign, began in the spring of that year.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:
  • Q:

    What did Theodore Roosevelt do for the environment?

    A:

    Theodore Roosevelt's efforts to protect the environment included establishing a pelican reserve in Florida, creating the Bureau of Forestry and finding ways to make dry land farmable again. When his presidency ended, he spent time exploring Africa and the Amazon to collect specimens for scientific investigation.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:
  • Q:

    What were other names for the North and South in the Civil War?

    A:

    The South side of the American Civil War became its own nation, called the Confederate States of America, or the Confederacy for short, while the North remained the United States of America and was called the Union. The South was also called Dixie, a nod to the Mason-Dixon line.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:
  • Q:

    What did the Keating Owen Child Labor Act do?

    A:

    The Keating Owen Child Labor Act of 1916 aimed to prevent the exploitation of children by banning the sale and shipment of goods produced by workers under age 16 in mines and under age 14 in factories, canneries and stores. The act also restricted children under 16 from working more than eight hours daily between 6 a.m. and 7 p.m. and limited them to a six-day workweek.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:

Explore