What did the Huron tribe eat?
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Q:

What did the Huron tribe eat?

A:

Quick Answer

The Huron Indians, also known as the Wyandot, ate corn, beans and squash that the women of the tribe grew, as well as deer, bear, wild turkey and fish brought in by the tribe's men. They also grew sunflowers for the seeds.

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Full Answer

Corn, beans and squash were known as the three sisters to the Wyandot and served as the basis for their diet. While men cleared the fields using slash-and-burn methods to prepare the land for cultivation, women did the actual farming, including planting, cultivating, harvesting and processing of the crops. In addition, the women grew tobacco as an item for trading with the nearby tribes. Each family had its own small plot of land for farming. Wyandot villages typically moved every 10 years as the soil used for farming became less fertile.

The Wyandot men hunted game using bows and arrows. They fished with nets, poles and spears, and their usual catch was whitefish. Once the men brought the game back to the village, the women were responsible for cleaning and cooking it.

The women then cooked soups and stews that used the game brought home by the men, as well as the vegetables they had raised. They also made cornbread.

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