Q:

Why did Mao Zedong undertake the Long March?

A:

Quick Answer

The Long March was a series of marches that the Red Army undertook to flee concerted attacks by the Guomingdang. It was started by Otto Braun, who convinced the Communist Party to expel Mao Zedong and retreat to Hunan, causing a loss of over 50 percent of their fighting force along the way. Control returned to Mao Zedong, whose success with the Red Army ascended him to power.

  Know More

Full Answer

Unlike Braun, Mao Zedong's strategy during the Long March revolved around splitting the Red Army into various small groups that were better able to hide from their pursuers. Rather than retreating to Hunan, Mao Zedong changed the destination to the Shaanxi province where the Red Army hoped to repel Japanese invaders and drum up popular support. Although only 10,000 men survived the grueling journey, they combined with communist troops to form an army of 80,000 men who fought the Guomingdang, creating an inspiring myth around Mao Zedong that attracted young Chinese men and women to his cause. In Mao Zedong's own words, the Red Army became a symbol for China's liberation and the Communist Party's strength and endurance with him positioned as its undisputed leader. His popularity allowed him to form the People's Republic of China.

Learn more about Modern Asia

Related Questions

  • Q:

    What are Mao Zedong's accomplishments?

    A:

    A controversial figure in Chinese history, Mao Zedong founded the People's Republic of China, transforming the nation into a socialist state and nationalizing industry and business under the government while implementing socialist reforms. His ideology, a combination of Marxist-Leninist thought and his political and military policies, is referred to under the collective umbrella of Maoism. He's praised for modernizing China and criticized for being a dictator who violated human rights.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:
  • Q:

    How did Mao Zedong win over peasants in China?

    A:

    Mao Zedong won over the peasants by writing articles supporting peasant uprisings against their landlords and praising their vigilantism. Mao described the landlords as "local bullies" and "lawless landlords," and praised the peasants' local community struggle meetings as the sole organ of authority.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:
  • Q:

    Why did Mao Zedong start the Cultural Revolution?

    A:

    Mao Zedong, Chairman of the Communist Party of China, started the Cultural Revolution, in 1966, as a means of purging Chinese society of any remnants of traditional, western or capitalist elements. Also known as the Great Proletarian Cultural Revolution, this was a frontal assault and mass attack against what were considered the social and intellectual remains of "the four olds" represented by old customs, habits, manners and culture. The sanitizing force came in the form of millions of adolescent and zealously dedicated Red Guards who swept across China in search of persons, places and things in need of being purged from the new social and cultural order they were committed to creating.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:
  • Q:

    What is the Manchurian Incident?

    A:

    The Manchurian Incident, commonly known as the Mukden Incident, was an explosion staged by rogue military officials in the attempt to justify the Japanese invasion of northeastern China, or Manchuria, in 1931. Fueled by economic and political interests, the incident involved placing a small amount of dynamite next to a Japanese-owned railway line near Mukden on Sept. 18, 1931.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:

Explore