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Where did Michael Faraday go to school?

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Quick Answer

According to the BBC, Michael Faraday educated himself by reading scientific texts during his teenage years before attending a few lectures at the Royal Institution. He only received a basic formal education as a child, most likely due to his family's lack of wealth.

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Full Answer

Michael Faraday was born on Sept. 22, 1791. By 1813, he had been appointed as a chemical assistant at the Royal Institution. In 1821, Faraday published his work on electromagnetic rotation. Despite his lack of a formal education, Faraday became an important academic figure and established a reputation as a leading scientific lecturer. In 1831, Faraday made his famous discovery of electromagnetic induction, paving the way for the transformation of electricity from a scientific curiosity to a practical technology.

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