Q:

When did Paul Revere say "The British Are Coming?"

A:

Quick Answer

On the night of April 18, 1775, Paul Revere said, "The British are coming!" He used the line to warn John Hancock and Samuel Adams of the impending British attack.

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Full Answer

Before the war, Paul Revere was a successful businessman. As his business grew, so did the tensions with the British. America was in the throes of trying to claim its independence, and the British were not making it easy on them. In order to do his part to aid in the war effort, Revere joined the Freemasons. He continually proved himself and quickly moved up through the ranks. Once the organization knew it could trust him, he was chosen to spy on the advancing British soldiers.

He also took on the responsibility of working as a courier for the Boston Committee of Correspondence. He, along with other members of the committee, was responsible for launching the Boston Tea Party.

After Revere rode through the town shouting his now-famous line, the Battle of Lexington began, which was the first battle of the American Revolution. During the war, Revere worked wherever his skills were needed. He manufactured gunpowder, helped to print America's first currency and was the commander of Castle William at Boston Harbor. At the time of his death in 1818, Revere had become known for his hard work and charitable contributions.

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