Where did the Pilgrims live?
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Q:

Where did the Pilgrims live?

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Quick Answer

The Pilgrims lived in Plymouth, New England, and they arrived in 1620, according to the Plimoth Plantation, an affiliate program of the Smithsonian Institution. The Pilgrims built their settlement on land that had been cleared by the Wampanoag tribe. This area is now known as Plymouth, Massachusetts.

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Full Answer

The Pilgrims had intended to travel to the Hudson River and live in what is now New York. The journey took longer than expected, and by the time the Pilgrims reached Cape Cod in November, bad weather made it too dangerous for the Mayflower to reach the planned destination. The Pilgrims lived on the Mayflower for several months until their houses were complete in March of 1621.

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Related Questions

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    What is the difference between the Pilgrims and Puritans?

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