Q:

When did the practice of knitting begin?

A:

Quick Answer

The earliest form of knitting, known as nalbinding, is believed to date back to roughly the third to fifth century of the Common Era. This single-needle knitting approach can be found in socks from this period of time.

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When did the practice of knitting begin?
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Full Answer

More traditional knitting that utilizes two sticks dates back to around the beginning of first millennium of the Common Era. This form of knitting  first gained prominence in the Middle East, particularly Egypt. Practitioners of the craft then introduced knitting techniques to Europe and later to the Americas. Between the 11th century and the 20th century, many knitting methods and knitting devices were developed across Europe. These innovations included an increase in the number of needles used and the invention of knitting patterns.


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